Culture

Wichita plays ball!

Wichita plays ball!

The 1907 Wichita Jobbers had the third best record of any 20th century minor league team.

The history of Wichita is inextricably intertwined with that of baseball, that most American of sporting pastimes. When Wichita was incorporated as a city in 1870, scarcely a year had passed since the formation of the first professional baseball club (the Cincinatti Red Stockings), and baseball fever was spreading across American settlements from coast to coast.

Section: 

This week in Wichita history (Part Three)

This week in Wichita history (Part Three)

This edition of Wichitarchaeology completes a three-part series of news highlights from historic July issues of the Wichita Eagle. The preceding two installments covered the period from 1872, when "Indian trouble" was headline news, to 1929, when Wichita's might as an aerospace industry giant was jeopardized by that year's devastating stock market crash.

Section: 

Wichita's forgotten fraternals

Wichita's forgotten fraternals

Young people today can be forgiven if they are confused about the nature of traditional fraternal organizations. Archaic, mysterious, inscrutable — "secret societies" whose members called themselves Eagles, Masons, Knights of Columbus, Odd Fellows, Daughters of Rebekah and Maccabees were once commonplace in American communities of every size.

Section: 

John Noble: Wichita's artist abroad

John Noble: Wichita's artist abroad

Wichita has long been fortunate in its strong and vibrant connection to the arts, and one of its earliest figures was John Noble, Jr. Born in our fair city in 1874 to English immigrant parents, Noble would later claim (falsely) to be "the first white child born in Wichita." It was but one of many fabrications in the self-made mythos of the man who dubbed himself "Wichita Bill."

Section: 

Pages

Subscribe to Culture