Food

by Don Winsor | Thursday, November 13 | Posted in Food

Winter is coming, according to popular culture, and it's almost time to shun the iced summer brew in favor of the life-giving warmth of hot coffee. Before long, it will be too cold to even think of venturing out of the house, so it's time to figure out how you're going to be brewing your coffee at home in the foreseeable future. So, I'm going to answer some common questions here about home brewing methods as a bit of a primer on what's best.

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by Don Winsor | Thursday, November 13 | Posted in Food

Depending on who you ask, a "babycino" is either a good idea, a bad idea or a horrifying coffee drink flavored with actual babies. The latter isn't remotely true, and those people are sick. "Babycino" is just a cutesy term for what New Zealanders call a "fluffy," and Americans used to call a "steamer" until they realized why that was a bad idea. Thanks, Cleveland!

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by Vickie Kline | Thursday, November 13 | Posted in Food

Fiasco (fē 'askō): 1. A complete and ignominious failure. 2. A round-bottomed glass flask for wine, especially Chianti, fitted with a woven, protective raffia basket that also enables the bottle to stand upright. — Webster's Unabridged

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by Vickie Kline | Thursday, November 13 | Posted in Food

"Wine is inspiring and adds greatly to the joy of living." — Napoleon Bonaparte

I was ready to take Napoleon at his word and experience some "joy of living" from a glass. Anxious to try this new wine, I was impressed with the look of the Cabernet Sauvignon from the moment it left the bottle and flowed into my glass. The striking rich color of ink indicated it would be a treat. The legs of the wine clung to the side of my glass like nothing commonly seen in the $12 range.

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by Vickie Kline | Thursday, November 13 | Posted in Food

"Wine makes daily living easier, less hurried, with fewer tensions and more tolerance." — Benjamin Franklin

I ponder those words from Benjamin Franklin as I arrive at the office, sit down and turn on my computer. I haven't yet opened my first spreadsheet and am already looking forward to eight hours from now when I can reverse this process by shutting down my computer and leaving the building.

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by Don Winsor | Thursday, November 13 | Posted in Food

For years, the privileged few were aware of a special coffee too expensive and rare for the masses. Called "Kopi Luwak," this coffee was, shall we say, "refined" in the bellies of Indonesian civets (a sort of monkey/cat thing) and deposited on the forest floors, gathered by harvesters and sold for fantastical amounts.

People paid a lot of money for this monkey poo coffee. There are reasons why this actually works, why the coffee is good, and why this makes some kind of sense, but I won't go into those just now.

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by Don Winsor | Thursday, November 13 | Posted in Food

If there is one city in the world I recommend you visit before you die, it would quite likely be Reykjavik, Iceland.

I've been there a couple of times before, a few years ago, but hadn't begun to journalize the caffeinations of my wandering here in F5. Also, I was more interested in the surrounding areas involved in the Blue Lagoon and the volcanic wastelands in the surrounding countryside than I was whiling away days seeking out the best cafes in town.

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by Don Winsor | Thursday, November 13 | Posted in Food

I closed a recent column with a promise to bring you the best coffee in Greenland. Trouble is, Greenland is not exactly full of bustling metropolis ... es. Metropoli. Big cities. Cities of any kind, really. The place I visited, Nanortalik, had one coffee place named "Cafe 44," which is less concerned with making great coffee and more with gathering supplies for the onset of the horrible, horrible winter which always looms. I had a cup of coffee, which was just fine, and decided not to spend what would've amounted to $8 for any espresso drink.

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A "new" 16th century-style ale is trending up.

by Elizabeth Jackel | Thursday, November 13 | Posted in Food

American craft brewers are an innovative lot — they are constantly pushing the limits by using increasingly off-the-wall ingredients or by cranking up the IBUs and ABV to almost obscene levels. Thankfully, in addition to their willingness to try new things, many American brewers are reviving a number of beer styles lost to history. Among the ancient styles being dusted off are the Gruit, an ale that uses a blend of herbs instead of hops, and the Sahti, a Finnish style brewed with juniper. The latest beer to see an American revival is the Gose.

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by Don Winsor | Thursday, November 13 | Posted in Food

On Saturday, Aug. 2, Reverie Coffee Roasters hosted the Midwest Barista Collective's Birdseye Throwdown 2.0 in which baristas from all over Kansas competed for prizes, cash, and the kind of street cred that only comes from being really great at latte art. Over 100 spectators filled Reverie's shop on Douglas to watch the 12 competitors in double-elimination thunderdome.

Sadly, I was unable to attend due to my constant awayliness™, but as Reverie proprietor Andrew Gough looks forward to many such events.

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by Sean Graves | Wednesday, July 30 | Posted in Food

Up until last week, we were having a pretty mild summer. This was great for a lot of reasons. It was still fun to be outside, I didn't break out into a sweat while grilling and my basement stayed cool enough to ferment the hoppy Saison that I brewed a couple weeks ago.

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by Don Winsor | Thursday, July 17 | Posted in Food

To paraphrase Martha and/or the Vandellas, summer's here and the time is right for dying in the heat. In winter, it's easy enough to justify hunkering down with a steaming mug of freshly extracted Ethiopian Yirgacheffe, but not in July. You could actually fry eggs on the sidewalk on many days, though omelettes are a challenge. It's a challenge we've discussed here before — you want good coffee, but you want it cold.

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by Don Winsor | Thursday, July 10 | Posted in Food

As the summer blasts you with heat, you may wonder, "What's the point of going on?" Why should you continue to endure this weather, these temperatures, this constant living in fear of a tornado destroying everything you own? What makes all this worthwhile when your very existence is at risk every single day, yet every day is so very much the same and you feel trapped in a Groundhog Day of work-home-sleep, work-home-sleep?

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by Don Winsor | Thursday, July 10 | Posted in Food

As the summer blasts you with heat, you may wonder, "What's the point of going on?" Why should you continue to endure this weather, these temperatures, this constant living in fear of a tornado destroying everything you own? What makes all this worthwhile when your very existence is at risk every single day, yet every day is so very much the same and you feel trapped in a Groundhog Day of work-home-sleep, work-home-sleep?

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Thursday, July 10 | Posted in Food

Cold salads are a summertime staple for cook-outs. For an out of the ordinary side dish, spicy and creamy Cold Peanut-Sesame Noodles with ginger are imaginative yet impossibly easy.

Ginger are the gnarly roots in that area of the produce section where only the brave venture. The vegetable appears to be the love child of a potato and coral and can be found in the scary shape of a hand. Beneath the thick brown skin, it bursts with floral freshness and a spicy, peppery bite.

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by Emilee Palomino | Thursday, July 10 | Posted in Food

Cold salads are a summertime staple for cook-outs. For an out of the ordinary side dish, spicy and creamy Cold Peanut-Sesame Noodles with ginger are imaginative yet impossibly easy.

Ginger are the gnarly roots in that area of the produce section where only the brave venture. The vegetable appears to be the love child of a potato and coral and can be found in the scary shape of a hand. Beneath the thick brown skin, it bursts with floral freshness and a spicy, peppery bite.

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by Sean Graves | Thursday, July 3 | Posted in Food

Last weekend I met up with some friends from college in Tulsa, which was a good halfway point from where we all live. We spent the weekend drinking, eating, bowling and wandering around a city that none of us knew that much about. Friday night, we had just come from a great local German beer hall and after a couple pints of Spaten Optimator each, we decided we were hungry. I didn't want to keep drinking beer while filling up with a big dinner, so I asked to see the wine list.

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There's a lot more depth than you'd think in this big family.

by Liz Jackel | Thursday, July 3 | Posted in Food

Lagers are those practically clear, nearly flavorless beers served ultra-cold and by the pitcher, right? WRONG! While it's true that Budweiser, Coors Light, Pabst Blue Ribbon and their ilk are, in fact, lagers, they are just the tip of the surprisingly deep, surprisingly dark iceberg. Speaking of ice, cool temperatures have everything to do with lagers. Their existence depends on them.

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by Liz Jackel | Thursday, June 19 | Posted in Food

Some people collect stamps. Some collect coins. Others compile stacks of comic books, shelves of figurines, boxes of baseball cards, or lists of phone numbers. I collect beer. When the zombie apocalypse comes, I may not have a cache of food or weapons, but I will be well stocked with beer. I expect to be quite popular.

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by Don Winsor | Thursday, June 19 | Posted in Food

In any business, success is often found by creating and/or filling a niche. It is also found through nepotism, but that's another story. A few weeks ago, I wrote that I'd heard about a simple device that had been designed to solve some of the few weaknesses in my favorite brewer, the AeroPress. The simple, pitcher-style item is called the JavaJug, and the folks at JavaJug wasted no time in providing me a sample unit to try out.

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