Food

by Elizabeth Jackel | Thursday, March 26 | Posted in Food

Kansas. The Wheat State. The Sunflower State. The Beer State? It might have been if it weren't for those teetotaling, busybodied, fun-hating killjoys who led the charge toward Prohibition. Kansas as "The Beer State" might be a stretch, but had we not been forced off the road to perdition there's no doubt that, in addition to being closer to eternal damnation, we would be much further along in our brewing history.

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by Don Winsor | Thursday, March 19 | Posted in Food

As you know, the west side of Wichita is a lawless wasteland where life is cheap and rough justice is dealt by bands of malfunctioning robot cowboy sheriffs who long ago escaped from Wild West World. The minivans of the funmoms in their Lululemon pants roam unchecked and your attempts to reach the IMAX at the Warren on 21st are entirely at your own risk. Until now, IMAX movies and pizzatacos were the only reason to venture west of West; now there is another.

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by Vickie Kline | Thursday, March 19 | Posted in Food

My front porch is whispering my name. Not outright calling me yet, just whispering and letting me know the time is drawing near. Yes, it won't be long until I'll be spending many evenings there: writing these articles, talking with the neighbors, petting my cats and relaxing with a glass of wine in hand.

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by Vickie Kline | Thursday, March 12 | Posted in Food

My husband and I take fall or winter vacations, which can sometimes be challenging but are always interesting. It's become a tradition to spend New Year's Eve at Table Rock Lake, and we also like to visit the Seattle and Oregon coasts during October or November. One year we ended up in Long Island in the fall and had the best time. That time of year brings discounts on flights, hotel rooms and few places are busy. It's a pleasant and unhurried time to become acquainted with an area and visit extensively with locals living there.

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by Don Winsor | Thursday, March 12 | Posted in Food

On last Thursday evening, the Eaton Venue downtown hosted the "Throwdown in Oldtown," an event to raise funds for Children First: CEO Kansas. The event revolved around the judging of cookies and latte art, attracting the area's top competitors in each field. Your favorite coffee joints and bakeries were represented in a sweaty thunderdome of sugar and caffeine, while upstairs bright young girls displayed their talents in a science fair in hopes of winning a scholarship to Space Camp. The place, not the movie.

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by Don Winsor | Thursday, March 5 | Posted in Food

One recent day while panel sampling a flight of craft beers courtesy of Old Chicago, it was remarked that I should write a column about the best cheap coffees. The kinds of coffee your parents have possibly been drinking since the 1970s. The kind of coffee that often isn't even available in whole bean form because what's the point, it's probably stale anyway.

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by Vickie Kline | Thursday, March 5 | Posted in Food

My husband and I gather with friends often to eat, drink and socialize. (I think we would be wise to add a visit to the gym in that list because the socializing doesn't burn enough calories for all we eat and drink.) When the group gets together we're always trying new things — maybe it's a recent food recipe, a new wine find or a combination of the two for a great pairing. For Valentine's Day, someone had the idea of hosting a wine blending party.

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by Elizabeth Jackel | Thursday, March 5 | Posted in Food

The day can be segmented by type of liquid in your cup: coffee, midday filler beverages and beer. Consumed on either side of vast and boring MFBs, coffee and beer rarely find themselves mug to mug, however these two elixirs have much in common. For starters, the primary ingredient in both is water. Next, are their plant-derived ingredients from which they each obtain their aroma, flavor and body — in coffee, the seeds of the Coffea plant; in beer, it's the flowers of Humulus lupulus and grain from the Hordeum vulgare.

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by Don Winsor | Thursday, February 19 | Posted in Food

For weeks I've been intending to make it over to Wheat State Distillery, 1635 E. 37th St. N., during their limited hours of retail operation each weekend, and this weekend I finally made good. David and Kim Bahre were exceptionally welcoming and eager to share their love for the process of distilling. Their giant series of tanks and columns, surrounded by pallets of ingredients and barrels of aging booze. The smell alone is enough to turn even the most ardent prohibitionist into an… well, let's call it an "alcoholist."

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by Vickie Kline | Thursday, February 19 | Posted in Food

I recently read an article about finding an "ah ha" wine — that special wine that we honestly like the taste, enjoy the experience and plan to drink more. I believe that's happened to me more than once and always takes my wine drinking to a new level. To find those "ah ha" wines, one does have to train one's pallet. For new wine drinkers learning, or experienced drinkers refreshing, there is a simple way to train.

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by Don Winsor | Thursday, February 12 | Posted in Food

Recently, Reverie Roasters owner Andrew Gough, along with Reverie's head roaster Ian Miller, joined a group of like-minded coffee professionals and enthusiasts on an educational trip to Guatemala, facilitated by an organization called Kapeh Utz. What they learned, according to Gough, was enough to convince them that what they didn't know about where coffee really comes from is important enough to change a bit of the way they operate.

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by Vickie Kline | Thursday, February 12 | Posted in Food

This is a wine that caught my eye because of a basic conundrum. The wine is called "The Corker" with the label being a picture of a cork. The interesting part is that it comes with a screw cap, so there is no cork present. Hmmm, have I stumbled upon some type of conspiracy? Or is the wine producer trying to pull a fast one?

Of course the answer to both of these questions is "no."

Salena Estate in South Australia addresses the issue directly and explains their reasoning for creating this confusing bottle of wine.

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Wednesday, February 11 | Posted in Food
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ICT Coffee Consortium brings local shops together to wield their strengths for good.

by Don Winsor | Thursday, February 5 | Posted in Food

When local businesses cooperate, we all win. In the (original) movie Miracle on 34th Street, a Macy's Santa sends a customer to rival department store Gimble's because they carry a specific item that Macy's does not. While the managers at Macy's at first huff-puffed in monochrome rage, they soon realized that this was actually a reasonable business strategy.

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by Vickie Kline | Thursday, February 5 | Posted in Food

Several people have approached me recently asking if I've tried 19 Crimes. I thought this question was rather bold and out of line, as the crimes I've taken part in aren't normally something I discuss in daily conversation. And since when are crimes numbered … and are there really only 19? Shame on me for not realizing the reference was to 19 Crimes wine. (And thank goodness I hadn't admitted to anything that would have the law knocking on my door.)

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by Don Winsor | Thursday, January 29 | Posted in Food

Most of the great independent coffee places in Wichita have the advantage of being in either generally high-traffic areas or in active neighborhoods with a population less averse to walking, biking or simply an interest in hanging out in their own part of the community.

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by Vickie Kline | Thursday, January 29 | Posted in Food

In 1912, a group of vintners set out to prove that not all great wine came from Italy or California, and they proceeded to pioneer the Washington wine region. This was the beginning of Chateau St. Michelle, whose roots date back to the Repeal of Prohibition. Chateau Ste. Michelle currently has two state-of-the-art wineries, one for red and one for white, and has definitely proved their point.

My husband and I can personally vouch for this, as we visited the Woodinville wine region several years ago and dropped in at Chateau St. Michelle for a tasting.

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by Don Winsor | Thursday, January 22 | Posted in Food

While I do appreciate a well-crafted coffee that requires patience and attention to create, I also have owned a Keurig and a Tassimo because they were convenient and novel. The Keurig I dropped because I could never get the quality I wanted, the Tassimo discs simply stopped being as readily available. Both purchases were in lieu of the single-serving coffee machine that even many coffee snobs agree is at least "not bad," the Nespresso.

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by Vickie Kline | Thursday, January 22 | Posted in Food

There was an interview with Meghan Trainor on NPR recently and now her song is stuck in my head. As irritating as this is, it gives me a good topic for discussion. For Meghan, it's all about the bass, and for wine drinkers, it's all about the glass. Before you start shaking your head, booing or hissing, let me explain. The shape of a glass changes the taste of wine and our experience when we drink it, meaning there is a reason for varying wine glass sizes and shapes.

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by Don Winsor | Thursday, January 15 | Posted in Food

I lived in and around Italy in 2012. While I love the country and learned many things, a component of my time there was some reinforcement of my mantra "stereotypes exist because enough people behave stereotypically." Thus it is no surprise that while they did send their first female astronaut, Samantha Cristoforetti, into space in November, they sent her there to cook.

OK, that's not exactly true, but they did send her with a cooking implement — the first zero-gravity certified espresso maker.

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